On May 26, 2010, Anthony Rivera was driving his car on Long Ridge Road in Pound Ridge when another car made a left turn and crashed into him. Mr. Rivera, then 30 years old,  sustained significant hip and knee injuries.

Mr. Rivera sued the driver and owner of the other vehicle and was awarded summary judgment of liability. The case then proceeded to a trial to determine the amount of damages.

The Westchester jury awarded plaintiff pain and suffering damages in the sum of $1,300,000 ($300,000 past – five years, $1,000,000 future – 40 years). He was also awarded damages for medical expenses ($170,000 past, $240,000 future) and loss of earnings ($75,000 – past). The awards have been affirmed in Rivera v. Kolsky (2d Dept. 2018).

Here are the injury details:

  • Intra-articular comminuted fracture dislocation of left hip (posterior wall acetabular fracture plus osteochondral femoral fracture) requiring two days of skeletal traction with the insertion of a distal femoral traction pin and then removal of the pin, open reduction internal fixation of the acetabular fracture with a bone graft harvest, screws and a nine-hole plate and open treatment of the femoral fracture
  • Three week emergent hospital admission followed by five week admission to nursing home for rehabilitation
  • Continuing pain and limited range of motion in hip and post-traumatic arthritis requiring hip replacement surgery within four years
  • Left knee torn meniscus requiring total knee replacement surgery within three to five years

 

A Post-Op X-Ray Similar to Plaintiff’s

Before the accident, plaintiff had been working at Home Depot earning about $25,000 a year. He was out of work for three years after the accident when he returned to Home Depot in the kitchen design department. There was no claim for future loss of earnings.

The defendants’ theme at trial was that plaintiff exaggerated his injuries. They conceded he sustained a significant hip injury with residuals but argued that “he’s driving, he’s going to work, he’s not using a cane … he does everything everybody else does” and he deserves no compensation for his alleged knee and pre-existing back injuries. The verdict sheet contained a specific question as to  whether the accident was a substantial factor in bringing about the injury to plaintiff’s back and they answered “no.” As to the knee, an MRI shortly after the accident disclosed a torn meniscus but two years later, another MRI was taken and plaintiff’s treating doctor then opined there was no meniscal tear and he elected not to perform an arthroscopy. Plaintiff’s medical expert at trial disagreed. The defense position was that there was no tear and any knee pain plaintiff was experiencing was due to his morbid obesity.

Inside Information:

  • Defendants opposed plaintiff’s pre-trial motion for summary judgment as to liability claiming that (a) winding, blind curves at the accident location caused the defendant driver to be unable to see the plaintiff’s vehicle and (b) plaintiff may have been speeding. These arguments were rejected and plaintiff’s motion was granted.
  • After plaintiff and his medical expert testified, the defendants rested without calling any witnesses.
  • In his summation, plaintiff’s attorney suggested $6,000,000 for pain and suffering damages; defense counsel simply stated that the jury should award what is reasonable or adequate (for the hip only), adding “He’ll probably blow it on something anyway, but at least give him what he’s entitled to for the hip.”
  • Plaintiff’s pre-trial settlement demand was $1,000,000 against an offer of $350,000.
  • This case was hard fought by one of New York’s most highly regarded plaintiff personal injury lawyers, Michael Ronemus and a worthy counterpart from the defense side, Robert Ondrovic.

On April 2, 2012, at about 5 p.m., Apolonia Castillo boarded a city bus on 57th Avenue between 97th Place and 98th Street in Queens. After paying her fare, she fell and sustained injuries to her left knee and spine.

Ms. Castillo, then 72 years old, sued the bus company claiming that the driver caused her to fall when he pulled away from the bus stop while she was still standing at the fare box in the front of the bus, not allowing her to safely move to a seat before the accident.

Before trial, defendant moved for summary judgment claiming that (a) plaintiff was already seated when the driver accelerated away from the bus stop and (b) plaintiff’s injuries failed to meet the statutory threshold under Insurance Law Section 5102.  The motion was denied in its entirety.

The Queens County jury agreed that the driver was fully at fault. In the immediately ensuing second phase of the trial, the jury found that plaintiff sustained both a significant limitation of use of a body function or system and a permanent consequential limitation of use of a body organ or member and they awarded plaintiff pain and suffering damages in the sum of $1,500,000 ($500,000 past – three years, $1,000,000 future – 10 years). Both the liability and damages verdicts have been affirmed on appeal in Castillo v. MTA Bus Co. (2d Dept. 2018).

Here are the injury details:

  • Left Knee – torn lateral and medial menisci requiring arthroscopic surgery (menisectomies, chondroplasty of the trochlear groove, lysis of adhesions and synovectomy) with continued difficulty walking (unable to tolerate more than one block due to pain)
  • Cervical Spine – disc bulges at C2-3 through C7-T1 with diminished range of motion
  • Lumbar Spine – disc bulges at L3-4 and L5-S1 with radiculopathy causing weakness and loss of sensation in left leg
  • Post-Concussive Syndrome

Six months before the accident,  plaintiff reported to her primary care physician that she had knee pain and she was referred for an orthopedic evaluation (which did not occur).  There were no further complaints of knee pain in the records of subsequent pre-accident visits to her physician and plaintiff testified that before the accident she had only mild knee discomfort on an infrequent basis. Plaintiff’s orthopedic surgeon opined that (a) her mild symptoms prior to the accident were greatly and severely worsened due to and following the accident and (b) she is at great risk for progressive breakdown of her knee’s remaining articular cartilage and will ultimately require a total knee replacement.

Inside Information:

  • Prior to the accident, plaintiff had intermittent neck pain for many years due to a motor vehicle accident when she was 35 years old.
  • Plaintiff’s pre-trial settlement demand was $750,000; there was no offer.

On February 21, 2011, Juan Quijano was crossing 32nd Street at Sixth Avenue in Manhattan when he was struck and knocked to the ground by a taxi whose driver was making a left turn.

32nd Street at Sixth Avenue

In the ensuing lawsuit, a Kings County jury found the driver fully at fault and the matter then proceeded to a trial on damages. Mr. Quijano, then 31 years old, was awarded $800,000 for his pain and suffering ($300,000 past – three and a half years, $500,000 future – 40 years). In Quijano v. American Transit Insurance Co. (2d Dept. 2017), the appellate court affirmed the judgment, rejecting defendants’ contention that the award was excessive.

As indicated in the court’s decision, plaintiff sustained shoulder, knee and spinal injuries. He was taken from the scene by ambulance to the local hospital  complaining of pain in those areas. Here are the injury details:

  • Shoulder: torn labrum of the rotator cuff with impingement syndrome requiring arthroscopic surgery in 2012 and leaving plaintiff with permanently damaged cartilage, significantly reduced range of motion and muscle power and at high risk for developing traumatic arthritis, adhesive capsulitis and scar tissue
  • Knee: medial meniscal tear and tilting of the patella leaving plaintiff with permanently damaged cartilage and requiting future surgery
  • Back – partial tear/bulge of the L4-5 disc with radiculopathy at the L5 nerve root (confirmed by EMG nerve test) requiring epidural injections and leaving plaintiff in constant pain
  • Neck – C5-C6 radiculopathy affecting biceps

Plaintiff claimed at trial that his pain was so acute that he had been for years and to the present taking 3-4 Vicodin pills per day 3-4 days a week. Furthermore, he alleged he still had difficulties with lifting heavy items, running with his child and playing soccer.

In addition to the award for pain and suffering, the jury also awarded, and the appellate court affirmed,  damages for future medical expenses in the sum of $800,000 (40 years). Plaintiff’s rehabilitation medicine physician testified that required medical expenses over Mr. Quijano’s lifetime will cost about $1,590,000 (at the rate of $39,000 per year ),  including $27,000 per year for epidural injections to both his back and neck, and costs for physicians, physical therapy and diagnostic tests.

Inside Information:

  • Plaintiff’s pre-trial settlement demand was $100,000 – the limit of the applicable liability insurance policy; the offer was $40,000. The amount of the judgment in excess of the coverage might be recovered in a bad faith refusal to settle claim.
  • Plaintiff resumed work (sales and house paining) a few months after the accident and there was no earnings loss claim presented to the jury.
  • The driver stated to a police officer at the scene that plaintiff ran into the side of his taxi but the driver was precluded from testifying at trial after he failed to appear several times for his pre-trial deposition.

 

 

On November 9, 2011, Stenneth Knight, then 43 years old, was driving to work when he was stopped at a red light and his car was rear-ended on Rockaway Parkway in Brooklyn. After a trial on liability, Mr. Knight was granted a directed verdict finding the other driver fully at fault and the case proceeded to a trial on damages only.

The Kings County jury determined that plaintiff sustained both a significant limitation of use of a body function or system and a  permanent consequential limitation of of use of a body organ or member (two of the threshold categories under Insurance Law Section 5102, any one of which is required in order to recover pain and suffering damages in New York car accident cases). Plaintiff was then awarded pain and suffering damages in the sum of $80,000 (past only – three and a half years).

The jury was not permitted to award any future damages because the trial judge precluded plaintiff’s expert orthopedic surgeon from testifying as to his opinion regarding prognosis and future medical treatment.

On appeal in Knight v. Barsch (2d Dept. 2017), the trial judge’s preclusion order was ruled erroneous and it was held that the jury should have been permitted to hear plaintiff’s expert’s opinions and award damages for future pain and suffering. Accordingly, the appellate court ordered a new trial on the issue of damages for future pain and suffering.

As indicated in the decision, plaintiff sustained several bulging discs and a a meniscal tear in his right knee. Here are the injury details:

  • Right Knee – complete tear of medial meniscus
  • Cervical Spine – bulging discs at C4-5, C5-6 and C6-7
  • Lumbar Spine – large disc protrusion at L4-5 and two smaller ones at L2-3 and L5-S1

 

Plaintiff drove his car from the scene to work (he was a chef) and first received medical treatment at an emergency room two days later complaining of knee, neck, back and shoulder pain. The next day, he began a two year course of three times a week treatment with a chiropractor. He also treated with an orthopedic surgeon (for eight months),  a pain management physician (who, over the course of a year, administered a series of facet nerve block injections in plaintiff’s neck and back) and a physical therapist.

Plaintiff’s only medical witness was his expert orthopedic surgeon, Jerry Lubliner, M.D., who examined plaintiff one time, in 2014.  Plaintiff testified that he still had pain and limitations in his neck and back a few days a week but that his knee pain was even more often, was the worst and required him to use a cane several days a week. As a result, he claimed, he could no longer enjoy playing cricket,  jogging or dancing in church and he could no longer help his wife with the laundry and other activities, nor could he cook any longer without using a high chair to sit.

None of plaintiff’s injuries required surgery as of the trial date although Dr. Lubliner testified that plaintiff has significant range of motion limitations that will be a problem for the rest of his life and he would have testified that Mr. Knight has permanent pain in his knee and spine and that he  “needs operative arthroscopy of the right knee and possible meniscal repair/menisectomy.”

The defense contended that plaintiff had pre-existing degeneration in his spine and knee, his injuries did not meet the serious injury threshold and there should be no award of any damages at all.

Inside Information:

  • In her closing argument, plaintiff’s attorney asked the jury to award $150,000 for her client’s past pain and suffering.
  • Plaintiff left his job as a chef because he had to stand all of the time and it was too painful. As of trial, he was working as an aide at a skilled nursing facility (where he claimed he was allowed to sit down for half of his shift). Plaintiff missed only one or two days from work and made no claim for loss of earnings.
  • Plaintiff’s treating orthopedic surgeon, Eric Senat, M.D.,  was not called to testify. The defense claimed that in 2014 Dr. Senat was found guilty of health care fraud and that the jury should be able to see a document from a workers compensation board to that effect because before testifying Dr. Lubliner reviewed Dr. Senat’s treatment records and Dr. Senat’s credibility (and the reliability of his records) should be considered by the jury. The trial judge would not allow the document in and the appellate court, in finding the parties’ “remaining contentions” to be without merit, agreed.

On August 16, 2006 Arnulfo Ahumada was working as a parking attendant in a parking garage at NYU Langone Medical Center at 530 First Avenue in Manhattan when he was struck by a rolling car whose driver had mistakenly left it on the ramp with its gear in neutral instead of park.

Mr. Ahumada, then a 51 year old Bronx resident, claimed significant knee and low back injuries and sued the driver of the car. At trial in August 2015, the judge rendered a directed verdict on liability against the driver and the matter then proceeded to an assessment of damages. The Bronx County jury awarded plaintiff pain and suffering damages in the sum of $750,000 ($500,000 past – nine years, $250,000 future – 10 years). The trial judge agreed with the defense that the awards were excessive and he ordered that the verdict be set aside and a new trial be held on damages. Plaintiff’s appeal followed.

In Ahumada v. Drogan (1st Dept. 2017), the appellate court agreed with the trial judge that the verdict was excessive but found that the judge should have allowed pain and suffering damages in the sum of $450,000 ($300,000 past, $150,000 future).

The decision mentions only that plaintiff’s injuries included a fractured fibula. Here are the injury details:

  • ambulance transport to hospital with complaints of bilateral knee pain and low back pain; treated and released to home with crutches and pain medication
  • admitted to hospital in the ensuing week for two days for possible blood clots in left leg
  • non-displaced left proximal fibular fracture
  • left knee torn meniscus requiring arthroscopic surgery  on 10/26/06

  • on crutches eight months, cane one month
  • out of work seven months
  • extensive physical therapy regimens both before and after surgery
  • herniated disc at L4-5
  • continuing knee and back pain
  • unable to resume bicycle riding, playing soccer, running or prolonged walking or standing

The jury heard extensive medical testimony on behalf of each side including expert orthopedic surgeons Leonard Harrison, M.D. for plaintiff and Mark I. Pitman, M.D. for defendant.

The defense  argued that the fibula fracture was insignificant (especially because it had not been diagnosed until several days later when plaintiff was examined for possible blood clots in his leg), the herniated disc was also insignificant (because there was no impingement on any nerve root) and the meniscus was merely shaved down and not repaired. Furthermore, the defense argued that plaintiff returned to work without restrictions seven months after this accident, hadn’t had any medical treatment for his knee injury for almost eight years and that a subsequent car accident (on 10/5/10) was the cause of any knee or back pain or disability that still existed as of trial and he had a pending lawsuit for that accident in which he’d be compensated for all of his injuries.

Plaintiff countered that the 2010 accident had nothing to do with his left knee or back (the injuries in the subsequent accident were to plaintiff’s neck and shoulder) and that his leg and back injuries are permanent, painful and disabling with the possibility of needing a total knee replacement some time in the future.

Inside Information:

  • The trial judge gave instructions to the jury (the jury charge) that included the issue of the subsequent accident.
  • In his summation, defense counsel suggested that the jury award damages only for past pain and suffering; plaintiff’s counsel asked for $3,000,000 equally split between past and future.
  • The defense hired an investigator who took surveillance film of plaintiff on 15 occasions and claimed that it showed plaintiff working without pain or restrictions. Plaintiff’s counsel contended the film  showed Mr. Ahumada struggling to walk, doing so slowly and with all his weight on his uninjured right leg.

 

On June 12, 2009, 32 year old Jason Kowalsky was a field technician for Verizon standing at the back of his parked van when he was hit by a pick-up truck owned by the County of Suffolk.

Verizin van

In his ensuing lawsuit, Kowalsky’s motion for summary judgment as to liability was granted and in August 2014 the case proceeded to a damages only trial.

Plaintiff was awarded pain and suffering damages in the sum of $1,050,000 ( $200,000 past – five years, $850,000 future -41 years). The trial judge ordered a reduction of the future damages award to $200,000. On appeal, in Kowalsky v. County of Suffolk (2d Dept. 2016), the entire pain and suffering award has been reinstated.

As set forth in the court’s decisions, plaintiff sustained a back injury that required surgery. Here are the injury details.

  • emergency transport to local hospital with severe overall body pain and knee placed in immobilizer; discharged to home by ambulance but returned to the hospital same day and two days later complaining of leg pain
  • right knee arthroscopic meniscal repair surgery on 12/2/09; partially torn anterior cruciate ligament and chondromalacia observed
  • knee brace for one month, crutches for three months
  • low back pain radiating to lower extremities due to annular tear at L4-5 requiring physical, injection and medication therapies and on 6/3/12 lumbar laminectomy surgery and a spinal fusion at L4-5 with screws, rod and a bone graft
  • at the time of trial, plaintiff had limited range of motion in his spine, chronic pain syndrome, was unable to lift or bend and the side effects of extensive continuing opioid pain medications (he was taking Oxycodone, Methadone, Flexeril, Ibuprofen and Ambien) left him sluggish, groggy, cognitively impaired, with extremely limited daily activities and unable to return to any work at all
  • all injuries were deemed permanent and plaintiff’s prognosis was poor for control of his chronic pain

annular tears 2

The jury also awarded economic damages in the sum of $4,038,000 ($2,625,000 for lost earnings and $1,413,000 for lost benefits). The trial judge ordered substantial reductions of all future economic (and future pain and suffering) losses but the appellate court reinstated them all. The jury award for past lost wages was at the rate of $75,000 per year which was about what plaintiff had earned in a recent year; future lost earnings (over a 24 year period) were based upon increases plaintiff claimed he would have enjoyed over the years. The defendants’ main argument as to the lost earnings awards was that plaintiff could perform some form of sedentary work, according to their experts. As the court noted, though, the jury was free to adopt the opinions of plaintiff’s expert physicians who opined that he could not return to any form of work, sedentary or otherwise (mainly due to the debilitating effects of continuing narcotic pain medications).

Inside Information:

  • Defendants raised on appeal an allegation that a year before trial plaintiff pled guilty to felonious grand theft and that any claims of accident related inability to work are extremely suspect. Plaintiff argued that this claim was not raised at trial and should therefore not be considered by the appellate court. It was not mentioned in the decisions.

On February 19, 2009, Ruben Corena drove his truck to the Sunoco gas station at 880 Garrison Avenue in the Bronx. While walking back to his truck after paying for his fuel, Mr. Corena fell and sustained injuries due to cracked pavement and oil on the ground.

Sunoco 990 Garrison Ave. Bronx
The Site of Mr. Corena’s Fall

On January 8, 2013, in the ensuing lawsuit against the property owner and lessor, the jury returned a verdict finding that the premises was unsafe and defendants were fully at fault for the accident and plaintiff’s injuries. The same jurors then awarded plaintiff pain and suffering damages in the sum of $450,000 ($250,000 past – four years, $200,000 future – 20 years).

In Corena v. BBZZ Equities, Inc., (2d Dept. 2016), both the liability and damages verdicts have been affirmed.

As to injuries, the appellate court decision mentions only that plaintiff fell to the ground, his leg became swollen and he had a protruding bone. Here are the injury details:

  • Left Leg: spiral fracture of the distal tibia and comminuted fracture of the fibula
  • Surgery #1 on 2/20/09:  external fixation to try to bring the bone together to heal, requiring a seven day hospital admission
  • Surgery #2 in April 2009: removal of external fixator due to an infection where a metal screw had been inserted into the ankle
  • Surgery #3 on 1/25/10: open reduction internal fixation (“ORIF”) with bone graft from hip, metal plate and eight screws implanted to repair the tibia where the fracture had been infected and was not healed, requiring a five day hospital admission
  • Torn meniscus left knee requiring surgery # 4 on 7/22/10 to arthroscopically repair (healed as of trial)
  • Back – herniated disc at L4-5 (surgery has been recommended)

tib fib fx types

Mr. Corena testified that he remained in near constant ankle and back pain with leg cramps and shooting pain in his back that left him with a loss of mobility and balance requiring a cane to walk and that he is unable to take long walks, play soccer or basketball, lift or carry his grandchildren, sit for long periods or go out dancing with his wife.

Plaintiff’s expert orthopedic surgeon opined that his ankle and back injuries and pain are permanent, he has ended up with one leg slightly shorter than the other (requiring a lift in his shoe), his prognosis is “guarded to poor” and manual work is out of the question while sedentary work wold be “hard because he can’t sit.” Defendant’s expert orthopedic surgeon testified that plaintiff’s back injury was not related to the accident (and that in any event he will not need back surgery) and that while plaintiff’s tibia injury is permanent, he does not require a cane and can perform sedentary work.

Mr. Corena, 51 years old at the time of trial, had been a truck driver for the two years before his accident. He never returned to work and the jury awarded him past loss of earnings damages in the sum of $150,000. He made no claim for future loss of earnings. Defendants argued that the entire past loss of earnings award should be set aside because plaintiff did not testify as to  his job duties, his hours and his wages except to the extent that he presented in evidence his W-2 statements for 2008. The trial judge agreed, in part, reducing that aspect of the verdict to $75,000. The appellate court, though, reinstated the entire $150,000 verdict for past loss of earnings finding that plaintiff’s documentation was sufficient and his claim for past wages was not speculative.

Plaintiff’s wife of 26 years, Maritza Corena, was awarded damages for loss of consortium in the sum of $55,000 ($40,000 past, $15,000 future – 10 years). These awards were affirmed on appeal over defendants’ argument that they were excessive and based simply on her testimony that “everything” changed after the accident and her husband “does nothing” around the house. There was more, though. Plaintiff himself testified that for almost three months after the accident his wife would give him showers in the kitchen sink and wash his leg. Also, before the accident the couple would go out dancing, go to parties and visit family members, things he could no longer do. Furthermore, he described how frustrated he was regarding his disabilities and how this led to his losing his temper and fighting with his wife.

 

 

On November 20, 1997, John Konvalin was a passenger on a Queens-bound subway train that collided into a train in front of it. The crash caused him to be thrown to the floor and fellow passengers to fall on top of him. Mr. Konvalin and the others were evacuated through the tunnel.

Subway Crash

The New York Times reported that 87 people were injured, among them Mr. Konvalin who, in pain, limped through the tunnel and was taken to the hospital where he was treated for a bruised left knee.

Normal Knee Anatomy
Normal Knee Anatomy

In his ensuing lawsuit against the transit authority, liability was conceded but plaintiff, a 58 year old salesman, ended up with serious hip and knee injuries and underwent extensive treatment that, in part, delayed the trial until 2012. The jury awarded pain and suffering damages in the sum of $450,000 (all for the 12 year period from the date of the accident to the date of the verdict, nothing for future damages).

In Konvalin v. New York City Transit Authority (Appellate Term, 2nd Department 2015), the award has been affirmed.

The court’s decision gives no information as to the injuries except to state that plaintiff underwent “several surgeries.” Here, then, are the injury details:

  • Left hip pain caused by repetitive stress from a gait that was altered because of knee pain resulting in joint deterioration and arthritic pain requiring total hip replacement surgery in January 2005
  • Left knee patella contusion resulting in chondromalacia, complex tears of the lateral meniscus and post-traumatic arthritis requiring two surgeries (arthroscopic meniscal repair in August 2005 and total knee replacement in 2009)
  • Extensive physical therapy regimens before and after all surgeries

replaced_hip_w

Plaintiff conceded that he made an excellent recovery from his injuries and did not challenge the jury’s failure to award any damages for future pain and suffering.

The defendant argued that the pain and suffering award was excessive based upon the facts that plaintiff had pre-existing arthritis in his hip, there was no record of any complaint about hip pain for at least two years after the accident and that the subway crash merely sped up by no more than four years his need for the surgery he underwent in 2005.

As to the knee, the defense argued that a 1998 MRI did not show a meniscal tear and a patella contusion would not “spread” arthritic changes to the remainder of the knee joint  and that therefore both knee surgeries were unrelated to the accident.

Inside Information:

  • Plaintiff also had pre-existing arthritis in his right hip, unrelated to the accident, that required total hip replacement surgery in 2008.
  • Plaintiff’s treating surgeons did not testify at trial; instead, he produced an expert who first examined plaintiff in 2009 (more than 10 years after the accident).

On September 15, 2009, Adelina Reyes was injured when she tripped and fell due to a defective subway grating on the sidewalk at 138th Street near Willis Avenue in the Bronx.

Grating Near the Scene
Subway Grating Near the Scene

The transit authority conceded liability and a lawsuit by the 53 year old Ms. Reyes addressed only the issue of damages.

On September 27, 2013, after eight days of trial, a Bronx jury returned a verdict for plaintiff’s pain and suffering in the sum of $1,000,000 ($250,000 past – four years, $750,000 future – 29 years).

The defendant appealed on the sole issue of excessiveness of the future damages.

In Reyes v. New York City Transit Authority (1st Dept. 2015), the award has been affirmed.

As set forth in the court’s decision, plaintiff sustained a torn meniscus that required arthroscopic surgery.

menisect

Here are more injury details:

  • transported from the scene by ambulance to the local hospital where a 10 centimeter laceration was debrided and closed with 15 staples
  • physical therapy three times a week for two years
  • arthroscopic surgery on 2/17/12: partial medial menisectomy (removal of part of the meniscus) and patella chondroplasty (removal of cartilage)
  • development of post-traumatic arthritis with Grade IV chondromalacia of the head of the femur
  • continuing pain and inability to return to work as a street cart vendor
  • antalgic gait requiring use of cane
  • need for total knee replacement surgery in about eight years

femoral chondromalacia

Ms. Reyes also sustained three bulging lumbar discs but she did not testify as to any continuing back pain. The defendant argued that this aspect of her injury was merely a lumbar strain that had resolved.

Inside Information:

  • In closing arguments, plaintiff’s attorney asked the jury for $250,000 for past pain and suffering plus $400,000 for the future.
  • Plaintiff admitted that her Facebook page contained a photograph of her standing in high heels without a cane, taken about 15 months before trial at a party for her daughter.
  • The jury awarded nothing for future medical expenses despite testimony that the future knee replacement surgery would cost about $50,000. Defendant argued on appeal that this meant that the jury did not believe plaintiff would undergo the surgery and that, therefore, the future pain and suffering award was excessive.
  • Plaintiff made no claim for loss of earnings.

Berthenia Singleton was 72 years old on November 4, 2003 when, as usual, at about 7:30 a.m., she escorted her eight year old granddaughter to the school bus stop outside their apartment building in Co-Op City at 2440 Hunter Avenue in the Bronx.

As they approached the bus, Ms. Singleton fell when her foot got caught in a defect in the courtyard sidewalk in front of the building. She fell to the ground, injuring her left knee.

Co-Op City

In her ensuing lawsuit against the property manager, Ms. Singleton claimed that the sidewalk was a tripping hazard that should have been remedied before her accident.

The jury agreed and found the defendant fully at fault. Plaintiff was awarded $300,000 for pain and suffering damages ($150,000 past – 7 1/2 years, $150,000 future – 10 years).

In Togut v. Riverbay Corp. (1st Dept. 2014), the judgment has been affirmed.

Here are the injury details:

  • Two days at home with swollen, tender and painful left knee
  • First medical treatment two days after the accident – at local hospital where she was treated for knee pain and released with a brace and cane
  • Referred by primary care doctor to orthopedic surgeon Sanjiv Bansal, M.D., who diagnosed her with a meniscal tear in her knee and patellofemoral chondromalacia
  • Treatment with Dr. Bansal and physical therapy for eight months
  • Surgery on 6/15/04: patellofemoral chondroplasty, partial medial meniscectomy and chondroplasty of the lateral femoral condyle and synovectomy
  • Surgery on 11/15/05: left partial medial meniscectomy, chondroplasty of the patella, medial femoral condyle, and synovectomy and chondroplasty of the lateral femoral condyle
  • Impaired activities: unable to walk long distances, needs assistance with grocery shopping and laundry, unable to get into car without having leg lifted, continuing pain and need for over the counter medication
  • Need for future total knee replacement surgery

About 10 years earlier, Ms. Singleton injured her left knee in an accident and underwent meniscal repair surgery. The defense claimed that she failed to prove her injury was not from the prior accident. Plaintiff, however, argued that she had completely recovered from the 10 year old accident, had returned to work and had no problems with her left knee within the year leading up to this accident. Furthermore, Dr. Bansal testified that despite the prior surgery she had a substantial amount of her meniscus remaining. The defendant’s expert orthopedic surgeon, Maurice Carter, M.D., testified that plaintiff’s current accident did not result in a traumatic tear to her meniscus or chondromalacia and he opined that her condition was “clearly a degenerative tear, wear and tear.”

Inside Information:

  • In closing arguments, plaintiff’s counsel asked the jury to award pain and suffering damages in the sum of $750,000 whereas defense counsel argued plaintiff was not believable and was entitled to nothing at all.
  • After a two and one-half week trial, the jury was sent out to deliberate at 4:30 p.m. and at 5:05 p.m. they advised the judge that they had reached a verdict. Defense counsel argued on appeal, unsuccessfully, that a new trial should have been ordered because the jury rushed to judgment.
  • In 2005, Ms. Singleton filed a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy petition but failed to list her then pending personal injury lawsuit in the schedule of her assets. Therefore, her lawsuit was dismissed in 2007; however, the bankruptcy trustee, Albert Togut, thereafter commenced a new lawsuit and that’s the one that went to trial.